All for Joomla All for Webmasters

Posts on Jan 1970

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – “Should I attend combines?” The Answer is Yes!

Coach’s Corner

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel

“Should I attend combines?”

For the past twelve years as I traveled about the country speaking to young men and their families, this is one of the most frequently asked questions. Basically, combines are a direct reflection of the NFL combine to which college athletes are invited. That combine is located in Indianapolis, attendance is based by invite-only, and every NFL team attends. A great performance at this combine can mean an individual can enhance his draft status. Like NFL combines, high school combines reflect the same testing stations: the forty-yard dash, a three cone drill, a bench press test, the vertical jump, the long jump, a shuttle run, and later position skill drills. Some combines may add events or eliminate some events, but generally speaking, this is the primary group. Your height and weight will also be recorded. Trust me when I say that the event is focused and can be very intense, as there is much at stake for NFL prospects.

Should you attend a combine? Absolutely! It is an opportunity to display your skills and to compare yourself to other people at your position or in your age group. My experience with high school combines has a history of over twelve years and stems from having attended David Schuman’s NUC Sports combines. If you’re looking for a good combine, check out his website – I know there will be an event somewhere near you.

At what age should you attend a combine? The answer is NOW. In this day and age in recruiting you need to have measurable evidence for college coaches right from the get-go. Remember though, if you are a freshmen or eighth grader, don’t become discouraged if your numbers do not reflect those of upperclassmen in attendance. Start by comparing yourself to others in your age bracket, then move on and work on improving.

Finally, remember this: “one combine does not a prospect make”. Take the numbers of your most recent combine and use those as your bottom line, then incorporate your training regimen to improve those numbers. When you are certain you are able to put up better numbers, attend another combine and do so. And when those numbers improve, make sure they get put in front of coaches – they will be impressed!

–     Coach Bob Chmiel

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Continue Reading

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – How The Recruiting Process Works, Forming Great Relationships

Coach’s Corner

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel

The recruiting process can be a very complicated endeavor. However, the fact is that it involves many of the principles of any of the relationships we have in life. From the very first day that you begin the process, please understand that anything and everything that you do or say may impact the interest level of different college coaches. In looking at the broader picture of the process, many items are of the upmost importance: creating a great highlight tape, building a strong transcript, thinking about camps and combines. The obvious list goes on.

In this note to you, I want to emphasize the most basic of all the items in the process: “there is no second chance at a great first impression.” 

A few suggestions to help you along the way from someone who was on the other side of the desk. If I call you as a college coach and you are not available, my call goes to your voice mail. What do I hear when this happens? Think about it. What does your voicemail sound like? Remember again that this may be my first impression of you. My suggestion to you is to take ownership of this process and know this journey of recruiting will be the most important journey of your young life. Moreover, it can very well determine what the next 40 years of your life will look like.

I totally understand peer pressure and all that goes with it. However, you must look at this as business trip. It’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to present yourself and your resume to the college or colleges of your choice. As I move forward with this note I want ask you to put yourself in the position of the coach who is calling you. I want you to think of what he initially feels about you.

My suggestion for your voicemail message is simple: “Hello, this is (insert your name) I am sorry I missed your call, please leave a message, thank you. Probably does not sound “too cool”, but in my opinion, “cool” is when you sign with the school of your dreams.

In future editions of “Coach’s Corner”, I’ll talk about the other ways to impress coaches early in the recruiting process.

–     Coach Bob Chmiel

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Continue Reading

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – Getting Scholarship Offers Early, What’s Really Going On?

Coach’s Corner

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel

LSU and Alabama recently offered an eighth grade football player a scholarship. An EIGHTH grader! In the not-too-distant past, this would have been unheard of. And whether we agree with the process as it now stands or not is irrelevant. The fact is, it is the culture of recruiting that now exist, and it’s going to affect you.

How did this come about? Technology and social media have changed the process dramatically. Everything is now accelerated, because information is more readily available to college coaches than ever before.

Here’s a bit of a history lesson: back in the day, high school game film was taken with a 16MM projector. The film was taken to a photo lab and developed after each game, and a typical game usually filled up two canisters of film.

After going through the film for coaching reasons, high school coaches usually put the film aside until college coaches visited during the May evaluation period. To make copies of the film was financially prohibitive, as it was just too expensive, and high school coaches were reluctant to send the film out to colleges. Why? If the film was sent out and a coach from another college stopped by, coaches didn’t have back-up versions of the film to share with the visiting coach. That old process basically led to college coaches getting their first look at a prospect in May of a young man’s junior year.

 

Enter VHS and the portability of the game tape immediately enhanced the recruiting process. High school coaches could now make multiple copies of games and send them to colleges, which allowed colleges to get their first look at prospects at a younger age. Still, though, this system was not as fast as today’s.

Today, the internet is the key. Because of sites like Hudl and YouTube, coaches can now access film for most prospects around the nation with the click of a button. Now, eighth graders are actually relevant to recruiters, as no prospect must wait until May of his junior year to be evaluated.  The recruiting lens of college coaches has expanded dramatically.

How does this affect you? You now have the ability to showcase your talents from the very first day you set foot on a high school football field. And from the other side of the desk, a college coach can begin to evaluate you on day one. You must have a recruiting strategy beginning at a young age – younger than you think.

No one ever told me they began an active role in the recruiting process “too early.” If you are a freshman, start NOW. For those of you who are beyond that point, you have no time to lose. Get started, and we can help.

–     Coach Bob Chmiel

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Continue Reading

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel- Making A Great First Impression With Coaches

Coach’s Corner

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel

In my last blog, I wrote about making a great first impression over the phone. The next step is making a great first impression when actually meeting the coaching staff in person. One thought before I move on: whether it is a game day visit, an unofficial visit, or an official visit, treat everyone who you encounter the way you would treat the head coach. That goes from the security people who direct you to the parking lot to the cafeteria workers to the staff who signs you in, to the assistant coaches – any faculty you may encounter throughout your time on campus.

Why? First and foremost, it is the right thing to do. Also, though, you must assume that everyone you meet will convey their thoughts about you to the coaching staff. If you want to get recruited by a school, showing respect is vital.

 

Before you leave for the visit, check yourself out in a mirror – I am serious – ask yourself, “if I were the head coach, would I have a favorable opinion of that guy in the mirror?” Leave the bling at home, because visits are business trips. Wear a collared shirt, and never a t-shirt. Jeans are acceptable provided they are at your waist. If you wear a cap, wear it like Derek Jeter wore his Yankee cap: not backwards, not off to the side.

 

This next tip may sound a bit obvious, but I’ll say it anyways: always look a coach straight in the eye when you’re speaking to him and when he’s speaking to you. Practice this with your family, your high school coach, or anyone else until it comes naturally. It has been written in many books that a first impression and a handshake can make all the difference in the world as the interview moves along.

 

Yes, this process of visiting a college coaching staff is, in fact, an interview. You are competing for a position at that university and on that football team. After you leave and those coaches meet and go over the visit, think about what makes you different from the other athletes who visit that school. Your demeanor, your appearance, a firm handshake, an attitude that show respect for everyone, and a positive attitude for the duration of the visit are all good places to start.

 

Finally, on the visit, politely ask everyone you meet for their business cards. Why? When you arrive home, you will blow coaches away if you send everyone on their staff a note thanking them for their time and letting them know how much you enjoyed the experience. If you follow all of these steps, you will set yourself apart from the competition and you will be well on your way toward getting recruited!

 – Bob Chmiel

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Continue Reading

Coach Bob Chmiel Recruiting Tips and Advice – From Dark Horse Recruiting

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Check back weekly for new articles.

 WEEKLY ARTICLES 

How is your resume looking? Yes, your resume!

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel- Dark Horse Recruiting – Football Camps For Recruiting

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel- Making A Great First Impression With Coaches

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – Getting Scholarship Offers Early, What’s Really Going On?

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – How The Recruiting Process Works, Forming Great Relationships

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel – “Should I attend combines?” The Answer is Yes!

Continue Reading

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel- Dark Horse Recruiting – Football Camps For Recruiting

Coach’s Corner

Weekly Recruiting Thoughts from Legendary Recruiting Coordinator Bob Chmiel

In my last blog, I wrote about combines. usually the terms “camps” and “combines” are mentioned in the same context. But in reality, they are totally different events. A combine (as I mentioned last week) may have a skill portion attached, but the actual purpose is to secure the measurables of the athletes participating. A camp may have a combine activity included with it, but basically, the goal of a camp is to improve the skill set of each individual athlete in attendance.

“What can I expect at a camp?” “Should I attend a particular camp?” “What if I am invited to a college camp?”

These are the most asked questions when I am speaking to students and parents.

So what can you expect at a camp? Most camps mirror each other in regard to schedules and activities. Usually, coaches from the camp will be in attendance at registration, and perhaps the coach who invited you will be there to greet you. Once everyone completes dorm check-in, you will be directed to a whole-camp meeting. At this meeting, various administrative policies specific to the camp will be addressed. Afterwards, you will be directed to your position-specific meeting, where you will have the opportunity to meet the coaches with whom you will be working. These coaches will make their expectations clear to you – LISTEN and pay close attention. The following morning after breakfast there will likely be combine testing. After the testing is complete, you will return to the skills portion of the camp with your specific coaches. As the day or week moves along there will be competitions. Linemen will go one on one, and receivers will run routes versus defensive backs. Take these competitions very seriously, and ALWAYS leave it all on the field.

Should you attend a particular camp? My suggestion: attend as many camps as you can. The reason is simple: the more camps you attend, the more exposure you will receive. And exposure is essential.

What if you are invited to a college camp? My most original premise about the recruiting process is that any positive relationship is based upon trust. Feel free to candidly ask the coach who extends the invitation why he wants you to attend. Does he have such sincere interest in you? Does he want to watch you perform to determine what his interest may be? Ask those questions and make your decision accordingly. If you are yet uncertain, speak to your high school coach. 

And finally, NEVER forgo your high schools camp to attend an offsite camp. The message you send in doing so is unacceptable. Nothing is more important that doing your best for your own high school team!

–     Coach Bob Chmiel

 

About Coach Chmiel

Bob Chmiel is one of the most respected Recruiting Coordinators in the history of college football, having held the position at Northern Illinois University, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan, and the University of Notre Dame. During his illustrious career, his teams appeared in fourteen college bowl games (including six Rose Bowls). He has over twenty-five years of experience working with football recruiting, and now, he serves as Dark Horse Sports Recruiting’s Director of Football Recruiting. For more information on Coach Chmiel, visit darkhorserecruits.com.

Continue Reading

NUC Sports Texas vs World Live Stream

NUC Texas vs The World Live Stream

12PM CST- Class 2018/2019 Final Scrimmage

3PM CST – Class of 2020/2021/2022 Game

6PM CST – Class of 2017 Game

Continue Reading